[SIGCIS-Members] CHM Prize for 2018: Ben Peters, How Not to Network a Nation

Ian S. King isking at uw.edu
Mon Oct 22 10:42:35 PDT 2018


I'm looking forward to reading this to compare and contrast with Janet
Abbate's 'Inventing the Internet'.  There's as much (if not more) to learn
from failure as from success.  -- Ian

On Mon, Oct 22, 2018 at 10:36 AM, Ben Peters <bjpeters at gmail.com> wrote:

> Dear SIGCIS Crew,
>
> Thank you, Andy! I’m flattered, humbled, and over the moon with this  kind
> announcement. The book owes much to many in this community and its
> longstanding interests in comparative and critical computing history.
>
> If interested, here is the 3000-word version:
>
> https://aeon.co/essays/how-the-soviets-invented-the-
> internet-and-why-it-didn-t-work
>
> Best,
>
> Ben
>
> Benjaminpeters.org
> @bjpeters
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On Oct 22, 2018, at 12:04 PM, Andrew Russell <arussell at arussell.org>
> wrote:
>
> Dear colleagues -
>
> It’s a pleasure to announce that the Computer History Museum Prize for
> 2018 has been awarded to Ben Peters for *How Not to Network a Nation: The
> Uneasy History of the Soviet Internet* (MIT Press, 2016).
>
> Please visit https://www.sigcis.org/2018chmprize for details, including
> the prize citation, which I reproduce below.
>
> Benjamin Peters’s history of the Soviet Internet represents a pathbreaking
> contribution to the understanding of the history of computing and
> networking. Based on detailed empirical research in Russian archives, it
> extends the reach of these histories into new, non-Anglo-American domains.
> In describing the complex institutional and political reasons for the
> ultimate failure of the All-State Automated Systems (OGAS), How Not to
> Network a Nation challenges common assumptions about the relationships
> between decentralization, free markets, and electronic networking. Peters’s
> treatment of Soviet networking brings into sharper view the
> infrastructures, power relations, successes, and shortcomings of our own
> electronic networks.
>
> Best regards,
>
> Andy
>
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-- 
Ian S. King, MSIS, MSCS, Ph.D. Candidate
The Information School <http://ischool.uw.edu>
Dissertation: "Why the Conversation Mattered: Constructing a Sociotechnical
Narrative Through a Design Lens

Principal Investigator, "Reflections on Early Computing and Social Change",
UW IRB #42619

Archivist, Voices From the Rwanda Tribunal <http://tribunalvoices.org>
Value Sensitive Design Research Lab <http://vsdesign.org>

University of Washington

There is an old Vulcan saying: "Only Nixon could go to China."
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