[SIGCIS-Members] History of intellectual property in computing?

Allan Olley allan.olley at utoronto.ca
Thu Oct 27 20:12:13 PDT 2016


Hi,
 	It is perhaps more of a curiosity and I can't say there is much 
elaboration, but I noted in a blog post some time ago that the practice 
of putting fake entries or mistakes in reference works, maps and so on as 
a potential basis to identify and discourage copying was an issue in 
table making in the mid-twentieth century and this is now an issue for 
the various on-line map services that are being put together and guiding 
us around. 
http://www.ithistory.org/blog/its-trap

-- 
Yours Truly,
Allan Olley, PhD

http://individual.utoronto.ca/fofound/

On Thu, 27 Oct 2016, McMillan, William W wrote:

> Thanks so much, everyone!  Extremely helpful... I look forward to many happy hours looking into these resources.
>
> - Bill
>
> ________________________________
> From: Annette Vee [annettevee at gmail.com]
> Sent: Thursday, October 27, 2016 2:31 PM
> To: Evan Koblentz
> Cc: Hansen Hsu; McMillan, William W; Sigcis
> Subject: Re: [SIGCIS-Members] History of intellectual property in computing?
>
> Along the lines of the work that Nathan Ensmenger recommends (humanist/sociology/rhetoric/history), I'd also suggest Gabriella Coleman's work on hacker's code and speech (particularly an article in Cultural Anthropology, "Code is Speech"). I have an article in Computational Culture on the metaphors used to describe code in the law, "Text, Speech, Machine": http://computationalculture.net/article/text-speech-machine-metaphors-for-computer-code-in-the-law .
>
> There's of course a huge body of work on this in law journals, particularly by Pamela Samuelson, Michael Madison, Greg Lastowka, Robert Merges, Mark Lemley, Julie Cohen, Dan Burk, and even a great write-up on copyright feasibility for computer programs by Justice Breyer in the Harvard Law Review in 1970.
>
> Annette Vee
> Assistant Professor of English
> University of Pittsburgh
>
> On Thu, Oct 27, 2016 at 2:18 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan at snarc.net<mailto:evan at snarc.net>> wrote:
> Another IP issue is hardware cloning. There were many Apple II clones and even some Macintosh clones -- some made with Apple's permission, others not. This continues today with the "Hackintosh" trend and, on the software side, the issue of jailbreaking and mobile app permissions.
>
> _______________________________________________
> This email is relayed from members at sigcis.org<http://sigcis.org>, the email discussion list of SHOT SIGCIS. Opinions expressed here are those of the member posting and are not reviewed, edited, or endorsed by SIGCIS. The list archives are at http://lists.sigcis.org/pipermail/members-sigcis.org/ and you can change your subscription options at http://lists.sigcis.org/listinfo.cgi/members-sigcis.org
>
> _______________________________________________
> This email is relayed from members at sigcis.org, the email discussion list of SHOT SIGCIS. Opinions expressed here are those of the member posting and are not reviewed, edited, or endorsed by SIGCIS. The list archives are at http://lists.sigcis.org/pipermail/members-sigcis.org/ and you can change your subscription options at http://lists.sigcis.org/listinfo.cgi/members-sigcis.org
>


More information about the Members mailing list