[SIGCIS-Members] “Please Read the Article”? Please Cite Women Academics.

Subramanian, Ramesh Prof. Ramesh.Subramanian at quinnipiac.edu
Wed Feb 24 14:21:42 PST 2016


Thank you for this, Meryl. I have posted this on the Yale ISP mail list - which means hundreds of affiliated fellows will at least know about this!

'Best,
-Ramesh

---------------------------------------------------------------------
Ramesh Subramanian, Ph.D.
Gabriel Ferrucci Professor of Computer Information Systems
Quinnipiac University
Hamden, CT 06518.
Phone: 203-582-5276
Email:rameshs at quinnipiac.edu
Web: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/about/directory/faculty-detail/?Dept=16&Person=23345
&
Fellow, Yale Law School - Information Society Project
New Haven, CT 06511
Email: ramesh.subramanian at yale.edu
Web: http://www.law.yale.edu/intellectuallife/9841.htm
________________________________
From: Members [members-bounces at lists.sigcis.org] on behalf of Meryl Alper [m.alper at neu.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, February 24, 2016 12:27 PM
To: members at lists.sigcis.org
Subject: [SIGCIS-Members] “Please Read the Article”? Please Cite Women Academics.

Hi all,

Over the weekend, journalist Fred Kaplan published an article in the New York Times, entitled "'WarGames' and Cybersecurity's Debt to a Hollywood Hack" (http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/21/movies/wargames-and-cybersecuritys-debt-to-a-hollywood-hack.html?_r=0<https://websitecheck.quinnipiac.edu/canit/urlproxy.php?_q=aHR0cDovL3d3dy5ueXRpbWVzLmNvbS8yMDE2LzAyLzIxL21vdmllcy93YXJnYW1lcy1hbmQtY3liZXJzZWN1cml0eXMtZGVidC10by1hLWhvbGx5d29vZC1oYWNrLmh0bWw%2FX3I9MA%3D%3D&_r=cXVpbm5pcGlhYy1lZHU%3D>).

The core argument -- that WarGames culturally influenced the Reagan administration's cyberpolicy -- sounded a great deal like communication scholar Stephanie Ricker Schulte's work.  When I brought this reference to Kaplan's attention on Twitter, he was super dismissive and minced my words.  So, naturally, I wrote a blog post about the incident, situating it within a broader trend of tech journalists (mostly men) minimizing the work of academics (mostly women), and capitalizing on this sin of omission in promoting their own books and other works:  https://merylalper.com/2016/02/22/please-read-the-article-please-cite-women-academics/<https://websitecheck.quinnipiac.edu/canit/urlproxy.php?_q=aHR0cHM6Ly9tZXJ5bGFscGVyLmNvbS8yMDE2LzAyLzIyL3BsZWFzZS1yZWFkLXRoZS1hcnRpY2xlLXBsZWFzZS1jaXRlLXdvbWVuLWFjYWRlbWljcy8%3D&_r=cXVpbm5pcGlhYy1lZHU%3D>

I'm really interested to know the thoughts of this community, both as one that knows the history of cyber law/policy inside and out, but one with many members committed to egalitarian principles.

Best,
Meryl

--
Meryl Alper
Assistant Professor
Department of Communication Studies
Northeastern University
Holmes 217
m.alper at neu.edu<mailto:m.alper at neu.edu>
merylalper.com<https://websitecheck.quinnipiac.edu/canit/urlproxy.php?_q=aHR0cDovL21lcnlsYWxwZXIuY29t&_r=cXVpbm5pcGlhYy1lZHU%3D>


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